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[456] mobbing at meeting of Boston Fem. A. S. S., 2.11-30, 37; censures the mayor, 13, 16, 17, 24, 30, 33, 34, 55; accused of ingratitude, 31; committed to jail, 27; leaves Boston for Brooklyn, 29, 37; reported insane, 39; sonnet to him, 45; goes to Boston, 46-48; nominated for State Legislature, 48, vote, 50; to Brooklyn again, 51; views on Thanksgivings, 51, on Peace, 52, on use of free produce, 53, on non-resistance, 64; censures Channing's Essay, 54, 57, 61, 65, 66, 84, 86, 89; vindicates Rev. G. B. Cheever, 63, and Channing against Austin, 68; portrait painted by Torrey, 69; attends A. S. fair, 68; interviews with H. Martineau, 69-71, 98; 30th birthday sonnet, 72 (1835)——Ends partnership with Knapp, 2.66, 84; labors with R. I. Legislature, 76; honorary foreign A. S. memberships, 82; life in Brooklyn, ill health, 83; direction of Lib. and of A. S. Society, 84-87; approval from A. S. societies, 87: criticism of G. Smith, 87, 88, 90, and praise, 88, first meets him, 88; criticism of Wayland's Elements, 94; attends hearing before Mass. Legislature, 95-97, 103; first meets Channing, 94, hears him preach, 98, 106; sonnets to his first-born, 100; attends meeting at Mrs. Chapman's, 105; hung in effigy at Fall River, 107; criticises Dr. Beecher's Thanksgiving sermon, 106, and Sabbath discourse, 106-114; Sabbath views exhibited, 107-114; remonstrances, 109-114, defenders, 113; not a man of one idea, 112; fondness for children, 115; attends meeting of 70 agents in N. Y., 114-117; aversion to extemporaneous speaking, 116; address to colored people in N. Y., 117; first meets Grimke sisters, 117; phrenological examination, 115, 118; at Geo. Benson's deathbed, 120 (1836)—Support from Mass. A. S. S., 2.122; writes its 5th annual report, 122; praise from E. G. Loring, 126; describes legislative resolves, 128; resolutions at Am. A. S. S. meeting, 130; at Ladies' A. S. Convention, 131; at New Eng. Convention, 277, 278; removes to Brooklyn, 128; comment on Channing's Birney letter, 132; meets J. H. Noyes, 144; letter from him, 145, 172, effect, 148-152; views of government, 156; Poem ‘True Rest,’ 152; attacked in Clerical Appeal, 137, 156, 158, reply, 138, 154; attacked by J. T. Woodbury, 141, reply, 154; upheld by Board and by A. S. societies, 157, 158, 162; talk with Grimkes, 116; censured by E. Wright, 162, 178, L. Tappan, 163, vindicated by Worcester Convention, 170; attacked by Gulliver, 171, reply, 172, by Spectator, for Sabbath example, 174, reply, 175; censured by Goodell, 181, 182; reports Lovejoy meeting, 189, judgment of Lovejoy, 190, eviews Channing's, 193; friendship with E. Quincy begun, 194; visits J. Q. Adams, 2.196 (1837)——Exposition of peace views with reference to governments, 2.201, 206; his Perfectionism, 204, 206; second son born, 208; removes to Boston, 208; ill, 208, 209; writes annual report Mass. Soc., 209; at N. Y. anniversary, 209, at Philadelphia, 210-217; visits Penn. Hall and the Grimkes, 211; hears Gurney preach, 212; speaks at Penn. Hall, 214, 215; describes the hall's destruction, 213-217; flees the city, 216, 217; at mobbing of Marlboro Chapel, 219; maintains equality of women in A. S. membership, 221; warns Am. Peace Soc., 222; part assigned in Peace Convention, 223, anticipations, 225, motions and speech, 227, 228, draws up Constitution and Declaration, 228, 230, 236, founds Non-Resistance Society, 229; remonstrance from G. Bourne, 238; officer of Boston A. S. S., 243; approves Goodell's objections to A. S. political party, 245, and censures G. Smith's plan, 246, 275; character slandered by clergy, 249, 250, vindicated by F. Jackson, 250; apprised of clerical plot, 253; will not mix nonresistance and abolition, 254; support for 1839, 256; on gradualism, 257 (1838)——Sums up politico-clerical assault on non-resistants, 2.260; plot to undermine his influence, 262; proposes a new paper, 262, 263; exposes plot, 265; accused and questioned by Stanton, 273 first speech in Faneuil Hall, 274; resolves on political duty of abolitionists, 275; confutes Whittier's report of division, 276; describes the breach with Exec. Com., 280-282; on Channing's letter to Clay, 282, on his own political advice to colored voters, 288, 289; accused of belief in spiritual wives, 289; on the nature and scope of abolition, 290; lecture at New Bedford, 292; at annual meeting of Am. A. S. S., 296-300, resolutions on political duty, 298; tribute to E. Wright, 300; reply to Birney, 300-305; change of view as to voting, 302; opposes a conference with new organizationists, 305; reply to address of Mass. Abolition Soc., 306; at Albany Convention, 308, 309, opposes Third Party movement, 311, 313, 319; draws out ‘Streak Letter,’ 315, 316; review of Exec. Committee's behavior, 321; repels Lundy's attack, 322, obituary tribute to him, 323; petition for removal of capital, 324; review of J. Q. Adams, 325; at Non-Resistance anniversary, 327-329; redeems his brother from Navy, 329; removes to Cambridgeport, 329; buys out Knapp, 331, 332(1839)——Key to G.'s opposition to Third Party, 2.333; annual report (1840), 334; resolutions on Fitch's recantation, 335, on proslavery church and clergy, 337, 338, 350, on pro-slavery Friends, 338, on the irrepressible conflict, 338; protest against Albany Convention,

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