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‘“ [247] abhorrence” ] will contend, that every man has a right to advocate abolition, or conspiracy, or murder; for he may do all these without breaking our laws, although in any Southern State public justice and public safety would require his punishment. But if we have no laws upon the subject, it is because the exigency was not anticipated. . . . Penal statutes against treasonable and seditious publications are necessary in all communities. We have them for our own protection; if they should include provisions for the protection of our neighbors it would be no additional encroachment upon the liberty of the press.’

But all such protestations went for nothing: the South had no patience to wait for their translation into censorship, or even into mobs. At Milledgeville, Georgia, in the State Senate, the practical Mr. Nesbit introduced, on the 29th of November, 1831, a resolution offering a reward of—dollars for the apprehension of Mr. Garrison, which finally took the following shape:

In Senate, November 30, 1831.
1 Resolved by the Senate and House of Representatives of the State of Georgia, in General Assembly met. That the sum of five thousand dollars be, and the same is hereby, appropriated to be paid to any person or persons who shall arrest, bring to trial and prosecute to conviction, under the laws of this State, the editor or publisher of a certain paper called the Liberator, published in the town of Boston and State of Massachusetts; or who shall arrest, bring to trial and prosecute to conviction, under the laws of this State, any other person or persons who shall utter, publish or circulate within the limits of this State said paper called the Liberator, or any other paper, circular, pamphlet, letter or address of a seditious character.

And that his Excellency the Governor is hereby authorized and requested to issue his warrant upon the Treasurer, for said sum of five thousand dollars, in favor of any person or persons who shall have arrested and brought to trial and prosecuted to conviction, under the laws of this State, the editor or publisher of the Liberator; or who shall have arrested and brought to trial or prosecuted to conviction, under the laws of this State, any other person or persons who shall utter, publish or circulate within the limits of this State said paper called the Liberator,


1 Laws of Georgia for 1831, p. 255; Lib. 3.123.

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