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[270]

Provocation.

An assertion that it is false pride, that makes domestic service so abhorrent to American girls.

Reply.

You, Madam, who talk so flippantly of the folly or false pride of our girls have you ever attempted to put yourself in their place and consider the matter? Have you ever weighed in the balance a crust and a garret at home, with better food and lodging in the house of a stranger? Have you ever thought of the difference between doing the most arduous and repulsive work for those you love, and who love you, and doing the same in a strange place for those to whom your only bond of attachment is six dollars a month Have you ever considered that the words of reproof and reproach, so easy to utter, are very hard to bear, especially from one whose right so to treat you is a thing of cash and of yesterday? Is the difference between freedom and service nothing to you? How many would you like to have ordering you?


Provocation.

A vain-glorious claim to pure democracy on the part of a proslavery Irish paper.

Reply.

We like Irish modesty—it is our own sort—but Irish ideas of Liberty are not always so thorough and consistent as we could wish them. To hate and resist the particular form of Oppression to which we have been exposed, by which we have suffered, is so natural and easy that we see little merit in it; to loathe and defy all Tyranny evermore, is what few severe sufferers by Oppression ever attain to. Ages of Slavery write their impress on the souls of the victims—we must not blame them, therefore, but cannot stifle our consciousness nor suppress our sorrow. It is sad to see how readily the great mass of our Irish-born citizens, themselves just escaped from a galling, degrading bondage, lend themselves to the iniquity of depressing and flouting the down-trodden African Race among us—it was specially sad to see them come up to the polls in squads, when our present State Constitution was adopted, and vote in solid mass against Equal Suffrage to all Citizens, shouting, “Down with the Nagurs! Let them go back to Africa, where they belong!” —for such was the language of Adopted Citizens of one or two years stand ing with regard to men born here, with their ancestors before them for several generations. We learn to hate Despotism and Enslavement more intensely when we are thus confronted by their ineffaceable impress on the souls of too many of their victims.


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