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[271]

Provocation.

An article in the Sunday Mercury condemning the Tribune for excluding theatrical criticism.

Reply.

The last time but one that we visited a theater—it was from seven to ten years ago—we were insulted by a ribald, buffoon song, in derision of total abstinence from intoxicating liquors. During the last season we understand that Mr. Brougham—whom we are specially blamed by the Mercury for not helping to a crowded benefit—has made a very nice thing of ridiculing Socialism. We doubt whether any great, pervading reform has been effected since there was a stage, which that stage has not ridiculed, misrepresented, and held up to popular odium. It is in its nature the creature of the mob—that is, of the least enlightened and least earnest portion of the community—and flatters the prejudices, courts the favor, and varnishes the vices of that portion. It bellows lustily for Liberty—meaning license to do as you please—but has small appetite for self-sacrifice, patient industry, and an unselfish devotion to duty. We fear that we shall not be able to like it, even with its groggeries and assignation-rooms shut up—but without this we cannot even begin.


Provocation.

A sermon by Dr. Hawks denouncing Socialism in the usual style of well-fed thoughtlessness.

Reply.

If “the Socialists,” as a body, were called upon to pronounce upon the propriety of taking the property of certain doctors of divinity and dividing it among the mechanics and laborers, to whom they have run recklessly and heavily in debt, we have no doubt they would vote very generally and heartily in the affirmative.


Provocation.

A letter bewailing the threatened dissolution of the Union.

Reply.

The dissolution of the Union would not be the dreadful affair he represents it. It would be a very absurd act on the part of the seceding party, and would work great inconvenience and embarrassment, especially to the people of the great Mississippi Valley. In time, however, matters would accommodate themselves to the new political arrangements, and we should grow as many bushels of corn to the acre, and get as many yards of cloth from a hundred


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