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[130] 4th, 7th and 15th batteries were engaged, with a loss of one man in the 7th. At Sailor's Creek (April 6) the 37th Infantry lost considerably, but the 19th, 20th and 28th Infantry, the 2d Cavalry and the 1st Heavy Artillery escaped without loss of life. At High Bridge (April 6) the 10th Battery had no loss, but the 4th Cavalry (Col. Francis Washburn), with a force of only 12 officers and 67 men, was surrounded by the Confederate cavalry, under Generals Rosser and Fitzhugh Lee, and, after once cutting their way through, returned to the defence of two infantry regiments which had accompanied them. Gen. Theodore Reed, commanding the expedition, was killed, and Colonel Washburn mortally wounded, Capts. W. T. Hodges and John D. B. Goddard, with First Lieut. George F. Davis, being also killed, and most of the men killed, wounded or captured. The results of the contest were, however, of great importance in checking the Confederates and leading to Lee's final surrender. Meanwhile, on April 3, Cos. E and H, 1st Mass. Cavalry, under Maj. A. H. Stevens, Jr., were the first troops to enter Richmond on the day of its evacuation; Major Stevens having received the surrender of the city and personally hoisting the guidons of his squadron over the State House.1

On April 6, at Rice's Station, the 34th Infantry had its last man killed (out of many), and at Farmville (April 7, 8) the 19th, 20th and 28th Infantry, the 1st Heavy Artillery and the 10th Battery were present, but without losses on the field, though Capt. Isaac H. Boyd (19th Mass.) died of wounds received there. This was for Massachusetts troops the last battle of the great Virginia campaign. On April 9 came the surrender at Appomattox.

In the first attack on Fort Fisher (Dec. 25, 1864) Massachusetts can hardly be said to have taken part, and at the second attack (Jan. 15, 1865) no Massachusetts troops can be said to have participated. It was in itself, however, an affair of great importance, this being the largest and strongest earthwork constructed by the Confederacy, and absolutely essential to it at last, through the protection given to Wilmington, the chief blockade-running port.2 Much blame has been cast upon a Massachusetts

1 See letter of Col. L. L. Langdon, U. S. A., Century Magazine, June, 1890, p. 309; also in Crowninshield's 1st Mass Cavalry, p. 472.

2 ‘Its capture ... effectually ended all blockade running. Lee sent me word that Fort Fisher must be held or he could not subsist his army.’ (Narrative of Col. Wm. Lamb in Century War Book, IV. 642.)

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