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[53] most important in which the Massachusetts troops had yet taken part. General Sedgwick's division, to which the 19th and 20th Mass. belonged, drove the famous Hampton Legion before it; and the 20th, which had now regained from captivity Colonel Lee, Major Revere and Adjutant Pearson, took an especially prominent part. The 10th and 7th also charged the enemy, the 10th forming four successive times under fire as regularly as if on the parade ground. General Hooker said in his report: ‘The 10th, commanded by Col. Henry S. Briggs of Pittsfield, son of the ex-governor, displayed the greatest bravery and materially checked the progress of the enemy.’ The loss of both officers and soldiers was heavy in this battle. There fell Lieut. J. D. Bullock of Fall River, of the 7th; Lieut. F. P. H. Rogers of Waltham, of the 16th; Lieut. Charles B. Warner of South Danvers, of the 19th; and Capts. Edwin E. Day of Greenfield and Elisha Smart of Adams, with Lieut. Benjamin F. Leland of Shelburne, all of the 10th Mass.

The 16th Mass. Infantry was sent out by General Hooker to feel the strength of the enemy, under instructions from General McClellan, and was engaged at Williamsburg, Va., June 18, with a loss of twenty-nine killed and mortally wounded, General Hooker reporting that the duty was executed ‘in fine style;’ and the 1st, 7th, 11th, 16th and 19th were engaged at Oak Grove June 25 with smaller losses.1

At the battle of Mechanicsville June 26, the 9th and 22d Mass., with the 1st and 3d batteries, were engaged, meeting with only slight loss; but at Gaines's Mill—the first attack made in force on the Army of the Potomac (June 27-28)—these two regiments lost very heavily, more than eighty being killed or mortally wounded from each, while their supports, the 10th, 15th and 29th, with the 1st, 3d and 5th batteries, suffered more slightly. It was at this battle that the 9th (Irish) Regiment, under Lieutenant-Colonel Guiney, fulfilled the prophecy made by the Hon. Edward Everett in regard to this portion of our people. ‘Their cordial sympathy warrants us in believing that if, on some hard-fought field, should the doubtful day be about to turn against us, the Irish brigade (as at Fontenoy) would rush to the rescue; with the terrible war-cry of Faugh-a-Ballagh they would sweep the foes of the Union before them, like chaff before the wind.’ On one

1 Narratives of the latter battle by Colonels Cowdin and Blaisdell may be found in Official War Records, XI (2), pp. 124-126, and General Hooker's Report, XI (3), p. 233.

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