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‘ [399] are getting used to my voice, and have confidence in me.’ He used every power and device to promote their ‘comfort and efficiency.’ After obtaining books and newspapers for them from friends, he writes, ‘I have gained completely the affections and confidence of the company by just such schemes as this, and now I think I could get them to do anything.’ And in the same spirit of mutual confidence, he describes with pride the superior skill of his backwoodsmen in various ways, his care for them, and his watch over their morale. His life among his brother officers was very pure. He would ask, ‘Shall we countenance in our companies by our example those vices which are more dangerous than bullets?’ In these winter quarters, therefore, he was at once recognized, and intrusted with many a duty beyond his rank. Speaking of his mediation between two regiments, Colonel Dwight says: ‘I had occasion to know his character even thus early, from a special duty which called for all his ability, energy, and judgment, and in which he acquitted himself to my entire satisfaction.’

In March began the first whispers of the Peninsular campaign. It was preceded by a short march to Dumfries, Virginia, on which he acted as Aid. Later he writes: ‘I would rather feel you were all hoping than fearing for me. I shall be careful, our force is overwhelming, and I am under God's care in all danger.’ Just previously to his regiment's embarkation, he accidentally wounded himself with his own pistol in his ankle, and was very reluctantly persuaded to remain in charge of convalescents in Maryland, with whom he rejoined the regiment, April 8th, before Yorktown.

Suddenly Yorktown was evacuated, and the army poured through, May 4th, to its first battle-field at Williamsburg, Hooker's division moving to the left against Fort Magruder. Colonel Dwight, considering Lieutenant Stevens's wound still painful and dangerous, detailed him to come on with the regimental train. This becoming stalled in the mud, he, hearing the first guns on the morning of the 5th, resigned his charge to a non-commissioned officer, and in the mud, the rain, the dark early morning, struggled to the field on

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