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[6] is now remembered only as the schoolmaster of a great poet, and that he did his duty well may be inferred from Dante's speaking of him gratefully as one who by times ‘taught him how man eternizes himself.’ This, and what Villani says of his refining the Tuscan idiom (for so we understand his farli scorti in bene parlare1), are to be noted as of probable influence on the career of his pupil. Of the order of Dante's studies nothing can be certainly affirmed. His biographers send him to Bologna, Padua, Paris, Naples, and even Oxford. All are doubtful, Paris and Oxford most of all, and the dates utterly undeterminable. Yet all are possible, nay, perhaps probable. Bologna and Padua we should be inclined to place before his exile; Paris and Oxford, if at all, after it. If no argument in favor of Paris is to be drawn from his Pape Satant2 and the corresponding paix, paix, Sathan, in the autobiography of Cellini, nor from the very definite allusion to Doctor Siger,3 we may yet infer from some passages in the Commedia that his wanderings had extended even farther;4 for it would not be hard to show that his comparisons and illustrations from outward things are almost invariably drawn from actual eyesight. As to the nature of his studies, there can be no doubt that he went through the trivium (grammar, dialectic, rhetoric) and the quadrivium (arithmetic, music, geometry, and astronomy) of the then ordinary university course. To these he afterward added painting (or at least drawing,—designavo un angelo sopra certe tavolette5), theology, and medicine.

1 Though he himself preferred French, and wrote his Tresor in that language for two reasons, ‘la una perche noi siano in Francia, e la altra perched la parlatura francesca é piu dilettevolee piu comune che tutti LI altri linguaggi.’ (Proemio, sul fine.)

2 Inferno, Canto VII.

3 Paradiso, Canto X.

4 See especially Inferno, IX. 112 et seq.; XII. 120; XV. 4 et seq.; XXXII. 25-30.

5 Vit. Nuov. p. 61, ed. Pesaro, 1829.

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