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[358] two of the redoubts held by Rowett, and then surrounded this last work with a storm of fire. Tourtellotte, on the east side, though badly wounded, managed to hold his main works, while Sears fought close up to the strong position.

About 10 a. m. Sherman had reached Kenesaw mountain, and seeing the smoke and hearing the artillery, signaled Corse to hold the fort, and ordered J. D. Cox's corps westward to threaten French's connection with the main Confederate army. Corse himself was severely wounded, but his men fought on under the assurance of relief, until French, early in the afternoon receiving intelligence of the threatening movement by General Cox, despaired of reducing the Federal garrison before night, and withdrew to rescue his command; but before leaving the place, he captured the blockhouse at Allatoona creek, and burned the bridge. General French reported a capture of 205 prisoners and two flags, and gave his loss at 122 killed, 443 wounded, and 233 missing, total 798. General Young was wounded and captured, and nearly 70 other gallant officers were either wounded or killed. These casualties were suffered by the Confederate assaulting force of only a little over 2,000. Corse reported his own loss at 142 killed, 352 wounded, and 212 missing, total 706.

Hood now moved rapidly toward Rome, and Sherman followed through Allatoona pass to Kingston, and thence to Rome, but Hood crossed below that city and marched into the valley of the Oostenaula, escaping any collision except between cavalry. The Confederate advance attacked Resaca and demanded its surrender, but the Federal garrison was reinforced in time for safety. Sherman also followed to Resaca, but before his arrival on the 14th, Hood had destroyed the railroad thence to Tunnel Hill and captured the garrisons at Dalton, Tilton and Mill Creek gap, about 1,000 prisoners in all. Sherman moved into Snake Creek gap, through which he had passed in the opposite direction five months before, and

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