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[449] columns in the final assault upon the city of the Montezumas. After the war with Mexico, Congress gave him a magnificent sword with jeweled hilt and a scabbard of solid gold. He was presented another beautiful sword by the Georgia legislature, and yet another by the city of Augusta. His subsequent service was in command of the department of the West, with headquarters at St. Louis until 1857, and then in charge of the department of Texas, with headquarters at San Antonio. In 1861, holding the rank of brevet major-general, he was the second officer of the army in seniority, and in case of the death or disability of General Scott, would have been the ranking officer. But upon the secession of Georgia he resigned his commission, and decided to share the fortunes of his native State. He was immediately appointed major-general in the Confederate States army, his commission bearing date May 22, 1861. He commanded at New Orleans during the first part of the war, but was soon compelled to resign on account of age and infirmity. When he left New Orleans he gave his beautiful swords into the keeping of a lady of that city, from whom General Butler, when he took command of the city, seized them, and turned them over to the United States government. They were for years on exhibition in the treasury at Washington, but in 1889 were returned to the Twiggs family. General Twiggs died at Augusta, Ga., September 5, 1862.


Major-General William H. T. Walker

Major-General William H. T. Walker, one of the most valiant soldiers of the South, achieved fame as a fearless fighter many years before the civil war. He was born in Georgia in the year 1816, received his early education in the schools of Augusta, and entered the United States military academy at West Point in 1832, where he was graduated in 1837 as second lieutenant of the Sixth infantry. He served in the campaign against the Indians in Florida, 1837-38, and at once came to the front as one of the most brilliant young officers in the army. In the

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