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‘ [41] with a peculiar emphasis— “Rather than concede to the State of Missouri the right to demand that my government shall not enlist troops within her limits, or bring troops into the State whenever it pleases, or move troops at its own will into, out of, or through the State; rather than concede to the State of Missouri for one single instant the right to dictate to my government in any matter, however unimportant, I would” —rising as he said this, and pointing in turn to every one in the room— “see you, and you, and you, and you and every man, woman and child in the State, dead and buried.” Then turning to the governor, he said: “This means war. In an hour one of my officers will call for you and conduct you out of my lines.” And then, without another word, without an inclination of the head, without even a look, he turned upon his heel and strode out of the room, rattling his spurs and clanking his saber, while we, whom he had left, and who had known each other for years, bade farewell to each other courteously and kindly, and separated —Blair and Conant to fight for the Union and we for the land of our birth.’

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Missouri (Missouri, United States) (2)
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