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[142] latitude, unconstitutional. This was welcome to the South, but it fired the Northern heart. In 1859, John Brown, fresh from the border warfare of Kansas, suddenly appeared at Harper's Ferry with a band of misguided men, and, murdering innocent citizens, invoked the insurrection of the slaves. This solidified and almost frenzied the South, and in turn the fate he suffered threw oil upon the Northern flames. Thus fell out of the gathering clouds the first big drops of the bloody storm. In 1860 Abraham Lincoln was elected President, and in his inaugural address he proclaimed his party's creed that the Dred-Scott decision might be reversed. The Southern States were already in procession of secession The high tides of revolution were in their flow.

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