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Jackson and Chancellorsville.

The fortunes of the Confederacy reached their spring-tide early in 1863. Its middle mile-stone stands at Chancellorsville. It will always stand there, a double monument to victory and to death. Its summit wreathed with laurels and bathed in sunlight; its base shadowed darkly by the cypress and the willow. It commemorates the triumph of courage directed by genius; it mourns the fall of that immortal soldier whom death only had power to claim from victory. And even victory's bright visage was stained with tears and clouded by the shadow of coming events as it looked upon Jackson dead.

Dead! but the end was fitting,
     First in the ranks he led,
And he marked the height of a nation's gain,
     As he lay in his harness—dead.

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Chancellorsville (Virginia, United States) (2)

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Stonewall Jackson (2)
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1863 AD (1)
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