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[335]

Insolent Guards.

The guard was generally of negroes, and their insolence and brutality were intolerable. They would beat the prisoners, order them about, and point their guns at them, ‘jest to see the d—d rebels scatter,’ these performances being much enjoyed by the ‘Yanks.’

‘Our rations grow daily worse, the pork more rancid, the soup more watery, the beef more lean and stringy.’ ,

In July two hundred and eighty-two of the nine thousand prisoners here penned were transported to Elmira, Mr. Keiley being of the number.

‘Embarking,’ he says, ‘we were packed like sheep or cattle in the reeking hold of a villianous tub, with no means of ventilation, save two narrow hatchways, the sun melting the pitch in the seams overhead. Many were seasick and all hungry, but for fifty hours the only food given us was a slice of bread and a couple of ounces of fat per man.’


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