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Six hundred gallant Confederate officers on Morris Island, S. C., in reach of Confederate guns.

They were held in retaliation, and two of them relate the experiences of prison Life—Stories of Captain F. C. Barnes and Captain R. E. Frayser.


A list of the officers under fire, as above, including those as well from Maryland, North Carolina, Texas, Mississippi, South Carolina, Florida, Alabama, Missouri, Kentucky, and Tennessee, has been given in Vol. XVII, Southern Historical Society Papers, pp. 34-46, but as the list from Virginia herewith is more complete and definitely descriptive, it is meet that it should be printed now.

Further and graphic experience of the ‘hardships, sufferings and hazards’ of the ‘Six Hundred,’ is given in the ‘narrative’ of Colonel Abram Fulkerson, of the 63d Tennessee infantry, Southern Historical Society Papers, Vol. XXII, pp. 127-146.—Editor.

During the seige of Charleston the powerful Federal guns located on Morris Island could send their shells into the lower part of the city, where their explosion caused great destruction of houses, and danger to the inhabitants of that part of the town. As a means of protecting the residents, Major-General Sam Jones, commanding the Confederate forces in Charleston, notified Major-General J. G. Foster, of the United States army, that he had placed five generals and forty-five field officers of the United States army, ‘in a part of the city occupied by non-combatants, the majority of whom are women and children. It is proper that I should inform you that it is a part of the city which has been for many months exposed day and night to the fire of your guns.’

This letter was sent on the 13th of June, 1864. Forthwith General Foster sent a copy of the letter to General Halleck, at Washington, and thereupon he ordered 600 Confederate officers to be taken from Fort Delaware and placed on Morris Island under the fire of the Confederate guns, in retaliation for the act of General Jones. [366]

Of these 600 officers, a list of the Virginians is given herewith, among whom will be found the name of Second Lieutenant C. F. Crisp, 10th Infantry, Luray, Page county. This second lieutenant was the late Speaker of the House of Representatives. Among others of the 600 not named with the Virginians, but well-known in Richmond, were Captain Thomas Pinckney, 4th cavalry, Charleston, S. C., and Colonel A. Fulkerson, 63rd Tennessee Infantry, Rogersville.

The only Richmond man in the lot was Second Lieutenant S. H. Hawes, Page's Virginia Battery. The story of the transportation and life of the 600 is told by Captain F. C. Barnes, then second lieutenant 56th Virginia Infantry, and Captain R. E. Frayser, signal officer, New Kent county. During a recent visit to Richmond, Captain Barnes, who is now an honored citizen of Chase City, was induced to give the following account of his experiences:

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F. C. Barnes (3)
Sam Jones (2)
Abram Fulkerson (2)
R. E. Frayser (2)
J. G. Foster (2)
Thomas Pinckney (1)
Powhatan R. Page (1)
S. Horace Hawes (1)
Halleck (1)
C. F. Crisp (1)
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June 13th, 1864 AD (1)
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