previous next
[174]

The Pulaski Guards. [from the Richmond, Va., times-dispatch, Nov. 27, 1904.]

Company C, 4th Virginia Infantry, at the first battle of Manassas, July 18, 1861.



The original Rebel yell.

With Prefatory note by U. S. Senator, J. W. Daniel.


by J. B. Caddall.

Editor of The Times-Dispatch.
Sir,—In forming his line of battle at first Manassas Jackson placed the 4th Virginia Infantry, under Colonel James F. Preston, in rear of his artillery as an immediate support, and the 27th Virginia Infantry, under Lieutenant-Colonel John Echols, in close order directly behind the 4th. The two regiments, except without the line of the 4th, was larger than the 29th, on account of its larger numbers, appeared as one body, four ranks deep. To the left of those two regiments, and almost at a right angle, was the 5th Virginia, under Colonel Kenton Harper, and to their left in the woods, were the 2d Virgininia, under Colonel James W. Allen (who was afterwards killed at Gaines' Mill) and then the 33d Virginia, under Colonel Arthur Cummings, constituted the left flank of the brigade.

When the critical juncture came, Jackson galloped to the right of the Fourth Virginia, called for Colonel Preston, told him in a few sharp words to ‘order the men behind, up,’ and to ‘charge and drive them to Washington!’ ‘Attention!’ Forward march! ‘Left oblique march!’ were the commands quickly given; ‘left oblique,’ an order to press the left flank of our artillery, which was between our infantry and Pickett's and Griffin's guns, which were to be charged.

Mr. J. B. Caddall, of Pulaski, was then in the 4th Virginia, and he gives an account, afterwards endorsed, with some interesting incidents of this regiment.

It is a notable fact that Jackson's brigade line furnished the first immovable obstacle to McDowell's advance, for while all the troops


Creative Commons License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 3.0 United States License.

An XML version of this text is available for download, with the additional restriction that you offer Perseus any modifications you make. Perseus provides credit for all accepted changes, storing new additions in a versioning system.

hide Places (automatically extracted)
hide People (automatically extracted)
hide Dates (automatically extracted)
Sort dates alphabetically, as they appear on the page, by frequency
Click on a date to search for it in this document.
November 27th, 1904 AD (1)
July 18th, 1861 AD (1)
hide Display Preferences
Greek Display:
Arabic Display:
View by Default:
Browse Bar: