previous next
[2] that he was in Richmond the Sunday before. Probably he was a ‘bounty-jumper.’ I was relieved at 8 P. M.

August 13. Heavy firing on our right to-day.

August 14. Sunday inspection. A rain began at 7 P. M., which continued through the night. Rumors of a move.

August 15. We turned out at 4 A. M., and a brigade of Burnside's colored troops took our places in the fort. Our whole corps was relieved, and we went back two miles to be held in reserve.

August 16. Turned out at 6. I was detailed with sixty men to work on Fort Sedgwick. All work had to be done in the night, as no one could live there in the daytime. The Rebel Fort MacMahon was near, and their sharpshooters were nearer, and picked off men with every opportunity. We reached the fort at 10 P. M., and soon had our tools in hand. We had just begun work, when orders came to report back to the regiment at once. We arrived there at midnight, and were told that our corps was to march at 3 P. M.

Accordingly, August 17 we fell in, ready to carry out this order, but while we were waiting another order came to turn in for the night, as we were not to move until the next morning.

August 18. We turned out at 3 A. M. This was the day of the ‘Battle of Weldon Railroad,’ sometimes called that of ‘the Six-Mile House,’ or ‘the Globe Tavern.’ We began our march at 5 towards the railroad (southwest and to our left), a distance of five or six miles, to the Yellow Tavern, or Six-Mile House. Here we found the Rebel pickets, and drove them before us. General Crawford's Division, to which our regiment belonged,1 formed a line of battle on the right of the railroad, and General Ayer, of the Second Division of our corps (the Fifth), formed on the left of the railroad. General Griffin's First Division (our corps) was in the rear tearing up the tracks, as we thus advanced towards Petersburg. We had proceeded about a mile

1 After Spottsylvania, May 8 to 20, our brigade was commanded by General Crawford, as General Robinson, our division commander, lost a leg at that time and was obliged to leave the front. General Crawford was the physician at Fort Sumter when it was taken in 1861.

Creative Commons License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 3.0 United States License.

An XML version of this text is available for download, with the additional restriction that you offer Perseus any modifications you make. Perseus provides credit for all accepted changes, storing new additions in a versioning system.

hide Places (automatically extracted)

View a map of the most frequently mentioned places in this document.

Sort places alphabetically, as they appear on the page, by frequency
Click on a place to search for it in this document.
Spottsylvania (Virginia, United States) (1)
Fort Sedgwick (Colorado, United States) (1)
hide People (automatically extracted)
Sort people alphabetically, as they appear on the page, by frequency
Click on a person to search for him/her in this document.
Crawford (3)
John C. Robinson (1)
Griffin (1)
Burnside (1)
Ayer (1)
hide Dates (automatically extracted)
Sort dates alphabetically, as they appear on the page, by frequency
Click on a date to search for it in this document.
1861 AD (1)
August 18th (1)
August 17th (1)
August 16th (1)
August 15th (1)
August 14th (1)
August 13th (1)
May 8th (1)
hide Display Preferences
Greek Display:
Arabic Display:
View by Default:
Browse Bar: