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[14] Quincy A., Lucy A., Martha A., Alfred E., Edward E., Margaret F., John W., Emmeline A.

John Stone died in 1819, and on the partition of his real estate a good slice fell to each married son or daughter. Mary, the oldest, had a piece running up the hill from Washington street, on which she had already located, the present Bonner Avenue perpetuating the name. Hannah had a piece next westerly, Nathaniel had the next strip, where Stone Avenue runs through now, Lydia Vinal next, to or somewhat beyond Warren avenue, Martha Sanborn next, up to Walnut street, and Lydia again west of Walnut Street. The lots of land were somewhat unequal in size and value, and the balance was made by means of money, which Lydia paid, she having a much larger share of land. Sanborn Avenue will carry down that name, and Vinal Avenue, Aldersey Street, and Quincy Street will recall members of the Vinal family.

Since so many men of two generations connected with this story had a part in it, perhaps a digression here may be pardoned, to refer to an institution which attained great prominence for a number of years in the early days of Somerville as a town. In 1838 the Charlestown authorities assigned a ‘tub’ hand engine, Mystic No. 6, to duty in ‘Charlestown's big back yard.’ In August the selectmen appointed the foremen and engineers, and among them we find the names of David A. Sanborn, William Bonner, Daniel Stone, Robert Vinal, and Robert Sanborn. The salary of the firemen, all volunteers, was $1.50 per annum, paid by abatement of the poll-tax. In 1840 Robert A. Vinal was clerk and treasurer. In 1849 a ‘Hanneman tub’ was purchased by the town, and the department was organized with Nathan Tufts as its first chief engineer. He was followed by Abram Welch, Robert A. Vinal, and John Runey.

‘A small bell was hung in the cupola of the engine house. For years, even after the Somerville company was organized, an alarm of fire could be rung only by means of this bell. For years, also, according to a law then in force, every man in town was required to hang two buckets, usually of leather and ’

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