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[22] and in his deep affection for wife, children, and all members of his family.


Vashti Eunice Ayer

(Prepared by Miss Elizabeth L. Waters.)
Vashti Eunice Ayer was born in Norwich, Conn., June 29, 1845, daughter of Nahum R. Hapgood, of Shrewsbury, and Emily (Chase) Hapgood, of Sutton. She was educated in the public schools of Worcester, and graduated from the Worcester High School in 1864. She taught in the schools of Worcester, Newton, and Somerville (in Somerville at the Prescott School). She was assistant to the superintendent of schools of Somerville from 1893 to 1897. She was married to John F. Ayer October 14, 1897. From 1898 to 1904 she served the Somerville Historical Society as corresponding secretary. She died at Wakefield April 13, 1908.

Gordon A. Southworth, superintendent of schools, said of her:—

Possessed of rich natural endowments, refined and cultivated in her tastes, a lover of the best in literature, nature, and art, cheerful, kind, generous, and loving, Mrs. Ayer impressed all who knew her with the strength and beauty of her character. For many years unusual burdens fell to her lot, which she bore with exemplary patience and fortitude. Long a teacher in Worcester, Somerville, and Newton, she left the impress of her character upon the minds and hearts of hundreds, by whom she will be long remembered.

Called to a position of responsibility in the administrative department of the Somerville public schools, she displayed executive and business ability of a high order, winning by her geniality and tact the confidence and regard of all.

Lemuel Harlow Snow was born in Eastham July 5, 1823, and died May 6, 1908, in Somerville. He had come to Somerville sixty years before with his father, who was a well-known carpenter in the town. Mr. Snow was for many years a street car conductor on the old Cambridge Street Railway.

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