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     But, in their stead, the warrior's settled pride,
And vanity's pleased smile with homage satisfied.

Enough for Weetamoo, that she alone
     Sat on his mat and slumbered at his side;
That he whose fame to her young ear had flown
     Now looked upon her proudly as his bride;
That he whose name the Mohawk trembling heard
     Vouchsafed to her at times a kindly look or word.

For she had learned the maxims of her race,
     Which teach the woman to become a slave,
And feel herself the pardonless disgrace
     Of love's fond weakness in the wise and brave,—
The scandal and the shame which they incur,
     Who give to woman all which man requires of her.

So passed the winter moons. The sun at last
     Broke link by link the frost chain of the rills,
And the warm breathings of the southwest passed
     Over the hoar rime of the Saugus hills;
The gray and desolate marsh grew green once more,
     And the birch-tree's tremulous shade fell round the Sachem's door.

Then from far Pennacook swift runners came,
     With gift and greeting for the Saugus chief;
Beseeching him in the great Sachem's name,
     That, with the coming of the flower and leaf,
The song of birds, the warm breeze and the rain,
     Young Weetamoo might greet her lonely sire again.

And Winnepurkit called his chiefs together,
     And a grave council in his wigwam met,

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