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[181] And, while my words are read,
Let this at least be said:
“Whate'er his life's defeatures,
He loved his fellow-creatures.

If, of the Law's stone table,
To bold he scarce was able
The first great precept fast,
He kept for man the last.

Through mortal lapse and dulness
What lacks the Eternal Fulness,
If still our weakness can
Love Him in loving man?

Age brought him no despairing
Of the world's future faring;
In human nature still
He found more good than ill.

To all who dumbly suffered,
His tongue and pen he offered;
His life was not his own,
Nor lived for self alone.

Hater of din and riot
He lived in days unquiet;
And, lover of all beauty,
Trod the hard ways of duty.

He meant no wrong to any
He sought the good of many,

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