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[62] separated in following after it, as to be easily captured at Menotomy by a body of exempts, or men too old to go into the conflict elsewhere. This event was variously noticed in the Provincial journals of the day. We cite a few instances:
‘At Menotomy, a few of our men attacked a party of twelve of the enemy, carrying stores and provisions to the troops, killed one of them, wounded several, made the rest prisoners, and took possession of all their arms, stores, provisions, &c., without any loss on our side.’— Essex Gazette, Salem, and Massachusetts Spy, Worcester.

The Salem Gazette, in a hand-bill published on the Fight, has the following: ‘At Menotomy, a few of the men’ [the Gazette says, ‘belonging to the detachment from Lynn End1] attacked a party of twelve of the enemy, carrying stores and provisions to the troops, killed two of them, wounded several, took six prisoners, shot five horses, and took possession of all their arms, stores, provisions, &c., without any loss on our side; among those who were killed was a lieutenant, who went with the provisions for his recreation, and to view the country; the officer of the guard, who generally attends on such occasions, being only a sergeant.’

Smith, in his West Cambridge on the Nineteenth of April, 1775, gives a minute account of this event, which occurred in front of the Precinct meeting-house, which stood on the site now occupied by that of the Arlington First Parish. The exempts took their position behind a wall opposite the meeting-house, and when the convoy came between them and the meeting-house, they took aim and ordered a surrender. As no attention was paid to this demand, except to hasten the speed of the convoy, the exempts fired and killed, probably, two of the enemy, and wounded several, shot five horses, drove off the guard, and took possession of the convoy and all its contents; making besides six of the guard prisoners, who are said in this account to have ran as far as the shore of Spy Pond, into which they threw their muskets before they surrendered. All this was without loss on the side of the Provincials. In the numbers given above we have depended on the newspaper accounts of the time. A memorial stone recently erected (1878) at the place, contains this inscription: ‘At this spot, April 19th, 1775, the Old Men of Menotomy captured a convoy of eighteen soldiers with supplies, on its way to join the British at Lexington.’

1 Now Lynnfield.

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