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[p. 5]

For the third time in the history of the United States, the nineteenth of April brought a call to arms.

Again the drums beat for recruits at the High street armory, and those who had heard it nearly forty years before felt like stopping their ears and fleeing from the sound, but the boys, sons and grandsons of the men of ‘61, were full of the same excitement as in the days of the Civil War. Ninety-two names were enrolled in one week. April 29, came the disappointing news that the 5th was not needed, but on May 24, the regiment was ordered to Gloucester for an eight days tour of duty. As it was not at all certain that the boys would be ordered back to Medford at its close, they were escorted to the cars by the citizens, High School Cadets, and Fire Department. The week was no play-time, for the weather was wet and stormy, and the regiment was exercised in war-time drills. A sharp but unrewarded watch was kept for the Spanish fleet. Orders were received that on the last day of June the Light Guard was to march to South Framingham and be mustered into the United States service.

On the evening of June 29, the Opera House was packed to suffocation. Ex-commander George L. Goodale presided. Mayor Lewis H. Lovering made the opening address. Members of the City Government and the Grand Army, clergymen and officers of the company spoke words of inspiration and enthusiasm.

Col. Whitney spoke in his quiet way, and stated that Co. E was the first in the regiment to report its ranks full (106 men). The most affecting scene was when Capt. Hutchins, at the close of his remarks, grasped the hand of Col. Whitney, who had enlisted under him, a boy, in 1862. Together they had been through terrible battles, and now, as colonel, the younger man was to lead the dear old 5th wherever he was ordered.

On the morning of the thirtieth of June, the square was full of people. The Light Guard was escorted by S. C. Lawrence Post 66 and the High School Cadets.

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