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[p. 7] cattle then and previously sent were provided by the governor, except three mares.

The three ships sent at this time were the historic Mayflower, the Pilgrim, and the Four Sisters. In other matters two-thirds was the company's proportion, one-third the governor's.

His agent seemed to be Mr. Samuel Sharpe, who had charge of the ordnance and artillery business of the colony. The silver seal and charter of the company were sent in his care. In case of the death of Endicott, Mr. Skelton or Sharpe was to assume command. In case of Sharpe's sickness, Henry Haughton was to act as Cradock's agent, but Haughton died the first year.

Capt. Israel Stoughton, in a letter to his brother, Dr. John Stoughton of London, dated from Dorchester, N. E., May, 1634, writes, β€˜Mr. Patrickson, Mr. Cradock's agent, happily came in the spring.’ This may refer to Capt. Daniel Patrick, who was at Watertown, and killed at Stamford, Conn., in 1643.

June 14, 1631, Philip Ratcliffe, a servant of Mr. Cradock, was convicted of malicious and scandalous speeches against the government and the church at Salem; he was censured, whipped, lost his ears, and was banished the plantation.

Of this affair Thomas Morton, in his New England Canaan, represents Ratcliffe as Mr. Innocence Faircloth, sent over by Mr. Matthias Charterparty, β€˜an injured man whose chief offence was asking payment of his debts in his sickness.’

Ratcliffe, Morton, and Sir Christopher Gardiner circulated stories, in refutation of which Capt. Thomas Wiggin, in 1632, writes Secretary Coke of his having just returned from New England, and speaks of them as scandalous characters, and their information false.

Morton published his New Canaan in 1637. Cradock writes to Governor Winthrop of a Mooreton he met on the Exchange in London, whom he would not talk with until he called Captain Pierce of the Mayflower as a witness to the conversation.

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