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[p. 58] Enoch had built for them the largest vessel up to that time, the St. Petersburg. She was built by Waterman & Ewell in 1839, and was one hundred and sixty feet long, thirty-three feet broad and eight hundred and fourteen tons burthen. She had the painted ports and square stern of a New York packet-ship, and had such beautiful fittings and accommodations that she attracted crowds of sightseers at every port. Richard Trask of Manchester, her master and part owner, was one of the dandy merchant captains of his generation. After arranging for the return cargo at St. Petersburg and visiting his friends, he would leave the vessel in charge of the first officer and return via London by steamer.

The word clipper means swift and clipper ship is one designed primarily for speed. Although vessels of this type were designed to carry large cargoes, they were so much faster than others of that time that they are usually referred to as the clipper type of 1830.


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