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The Convention.

The secession resolutions adopted by the people of Charlotte were presented on Staturday, by Mr.Bouldin.Two petitions for an Ordinance of Secession, from the people of Norfolk county, were presented by Mr.Chanbliss. It was after wards stated by Mr.Holladaythat the signers of the petitions constituted but a small minority of the voters of the county. Mr.Johnsonpresented a secession memorial, signed by 1,530 citizens of Richmond, and Mr.Macfarlandfollowed it up by presenting the resolution lately adopted by the Union men at the African Church. All these documents were referred to the Committee on Federal Relations.

In Committee of the Whole, various amendments were offered to the 9th resolution of the report, and rejected, after which the resolution was adopted without essential alteration. The Committee then referred back to the 8th resolution, which recognizes the right of secession for just cause. Mr. Carlilemade a persevering but unavailing effort to amend, by way of a substitute embodying a resolution offered some weeks ago by Mr.Burley, of Marshall, denying the right of peaceable secession. The 8th resolution was adopted, with a slight amendment, which does not change its meaning. Without proceeding further, the Committee rose.

Quite an excitement was occasioned in the Convention, late in the evening, by a series of resolutions offered by Mr.Preston,of Montgomery, a strong Union man. These resolutions deny the right of the Federal Government to subjugate a State, and call uponLincolnto show his hand with regard to his future policy; also, provide for the appointment of a committee to wait upon that Black Republican functionary to request him to communicate his intentions to the Convention. The resolutions were modified, at the suggestion of Mr.Baldwin,and passed; but Mr.Jackson,of Wood, claimed that the question had been misunderstood, and it was agreed to take the vote over again. Mr.Jacksonmade a speech, in which he declared that neither he nor his constituents would, under any circumstances, join with South Carolina. This declaration was taken hold of by Mr.Montague as foreshadowing that Eastern men could hope for no encouragement from that quarter. The feelings of the members were gradually working up to a high pitch, when an adjournment was carried, with the expectation that Sabbath reflection would have a beneficent influence, and that on Monday morning the Convention would be in a frame of mind to act harmoniously.

The Convention meets this morning at the Capitol.

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