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The Chinese rebels and the Chinese trade

--Com. Stribling, the commander of the American squadron in the Chinese seas, writes to the Navy Department from Shanghai, under the date of Sept. 4th, that, in consequence of the repulse of the Chinese rebels in their attack upon that place, they had taken steps to prevent silk and tea from being sent into the country. Trade was thus stopped, and no improvement could be expected until the rebels are expelled from the great cities which sustain the business of Shanghai. It was impossible to say what will be the effect upon commerce from terminating the war.--There will be much speculation at the new ports to be opened to commerce by the treaty of Tien-tsin, and, it will be some time before trade will be properly understood and regulated.

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