previous next


The Hampton Lesson.

The burning of Hampton is a warning to the North of the utter impossibility of gaining the object of this war. That object is to compel the South to remain a commercial and manufacturing vassal of the North. It could not be achieved if the flag of the U. States could be made to wave in triumph from Washington to the Rio Grande. The spirit and temper in which this war has begun; the proclamation in advance of rape and rapine, handcuffing and hanging, as the proper mode of conducting the war; and the acts of Congress confiscating Southern property, leave no other alternative to a people who have the slightest spark of spirit than to resist the invaders to the death and by the most extreme measures of resistance. It may be difficult for mercenary souls to comprehend the fact, but they may as well understand it at first as at last, that Hampton is but the beginning of the end. Its own property holders applied the torch to their dwellings rather than they should fall again into the hands of the invaders, and the property holders of Richmond, and of every other Southern city, would, under similar circumstances, do the same. The spirit of self-sacrifice which the South has so universally exhibited, can be exercised by the Southern people with much less pain and sorrow in the surrender of property than in the surrender of the lives of those who are dearer than houses, lands and gold. The tenderest Southern mother has not hesitated to give up her son, her only son, upon the altar of Patriotism, and there is no Southern father so devoted to greed that he will not give up his property even more cheerfully. Even could the invaders succeed, their every step would be lighted by burning cities, and by every bale of cotton in the South in flames.

Creative Commons License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 3.0 United States License.

An XML version of this text is available for download, with the additional restriction that you offer Perseus any modifications you make. Perseus provides credit for all accepted changes, storing new additions in a versioning system.

hide Places (automatically extracted)

View a map of the most frequently mentioned places in this document.

Sort places alphabetically, as they appear on the page, by frequency
Click on a place to search for it in this document.
Hampton (Virginia, United States) (1)

Visualize the most frequently mentioned Pleiades ancient places in this text.

Download Pleiades ancient places geospacial dataset for this text.

hide People (automatically extracted)
Sort people alphabetically, as they appear on the page, by frequency
Click on a person to search for him/her in this document.
William Hampton (1)
hide Display Preferences
Greek Display:
Arabic Display:
View by Default:
Browse Bar: