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Coffee.

The coffee question is now fairly before the public, and consumers may blame themselves if they cannot select, from all the suggestions, a nutritious beverage for the breakfast table. One correspondent writes that he has for some time being making experiments with various seeds as substitutes for coffee, and finds Poughton wheat the best of them all, indeed, he says it makes a very pleasant beverage, and with a fourth or a fifth part of coffee ground with it, very few would be able to distinguish it from the best Java. Another correspondent writes that wheat and rye may both possess the virtue of being wholesome and uninjurious, but another plant chicorium, or wild succory, has a flavor so strongly resembling our favorite beverage that it is largely used in Europe to adulterate it. Its qualities are known to be exceedingly wholesome, and to be approved by invalids as not exciting the nerves as coffee does. It may be gathered near the coast. Its bright blue flowers, of a star-like form, at the joints of the straggling stem, render it easily known. The roots are dried, roasted, and ground, either to be mixed with coffee, or made alone. Before coffee gets too scarce, it would be as well to mix it with substitutes.

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