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[106] From this we see that sensual pleasure is quite unworthy of the dignity of man and that we ought to despise it and cast it from us; but if someone should be found who sets some value upon sensual gratification, he must keep strictly within the limits of moderate indulgence. One's physical comforts and wants, therefore, should be ordered according to the demands of health and strength, not according to the calls of pleasure. And if we will only bear in mind the superiority and dignity of our nature, we shall realize how wrong it is to abandon ourselves to excess and to live in luxury and voluptuousness, and how right it is to live in thrift, selfdenial, simplicity, and sobriety.

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load focus Notes (Walter Miller, 1913)
load focus Introduction (Walter Miller, 1913)
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hide References (2 total)
  • Cross-references in indexes to this page (2):
    • M. Tullius Cicero, De Officiis: index, Luxury
    • M. Tullius Cicero, De Officiis: index, Vice
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