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[67] All the glory and greatness and, I may add, all the1 usefulness of these two characteristics of courage are centred in the latter; the rational cause that makes men great, in the former. For it is the former that2 contains the element that makes souls pre-eminent and indifferent to worldly fortune. And this quality is distinguished by two criteria: (1) if one account moral rectitude as the only good; and (2) if one be free from all passion. For we must agree that it takes a brave and heroic soul to hold as slight what most people think grand and glorious, and to disregard it from fixed and settled principles. And it requires strength of character and great singleness of purpose to bear what seems painful, as it comes to pass in many and various forms in human life, and to bear it so unflinchingly as not to be shaken in the least from one's natural state of the dignity of a philosopher.

1 (1) Moral courage.

2 Indifference to outward fortunes.

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  • Cross-references in indexes to this page (2):
    • M. Tullius Cicero, De Officiis: index, Good
    • M. Tullius Cicero, De Officiis: index, Society
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