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[73] This is easier for the philosophers; as their life is less exposed to the assaults of fortune, their wants are fewer; and, if any misfortune overtakes them, their fall is not so disastrous. Not without reason, therefore, are stronger emotions aroused in those who engage in public life than in those who live in retirement, and greater is their ambition for success; the more, therefore, do they need to enjoy greatness of spirit and freedom from annoying cares.

If anyone is entering public life, let him beware of thinking only of the honour that it brings; but let him be sure also that he has the ability to succeed. At the same time, let him take care not to lose heart too readily through discouragement nor yet to be over-confident through ambition. In a word, before undertaking any enterprise, careful preparation must be made.

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load focus Notes (Walter Miller, 1913)
load focus Introduction (Walter Miller, 1913)
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hide References (3 total)
  • Cross-references in notes to this page (1):
  • Cross-references in indexes to this page (2):
    • M. Tullius Cicero, De Officiis: index, Duty
    • M. Tullius Cicero, De Officiis: index, Public Service
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