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[38] 11. As, then, this superiority of mind to such1 externals inspires great admiration, so justice, above all, on the basis of which alone men are called “good men,” seems to people generally a quite marvellous virtue—and not without good reason; for no one can be just who fears death or pain or exile or poverty, or who values their opposites above equity. And people admire especially the man who is uninfluenced by money; and if a man has proved himself in this direction, they think him tried as by fire.

Those three requisites, therefore, which were presupposed as the means of obtaining glory, are all secured by justice: (1) good-will, for it seeks to be of help to the greatest number; (2) confidence, for the same reason; and (3) admiration, because it scorns and cares nothing for those things, with a consuming passion for which most people are carried away.

1 Justice is the best way to popularity.

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load focus Introduction (Walter Miller, 1913)
load focus Latin (Walter Miller, 1913)
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  • Cross-references in indexes to this page (1):
    • M. Tullius Cicero, De Officiis: index, Avarice
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