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[42] And yet we are not required to sacrifice our own1 interests and surrender to others what we need for ourselves, but each one should consider his own interests, as far as he may without injury to his neighbour's. “When a man enters the foot-race,” says Chrysippus with his usual aptness, “it is his duty to put forth all his strength and strive with all his might to win; but he ought never with his foot to trip, or with his hand to foul a competitor. Thus in the stadium of life, it is not unfair for anyone to seek to obtain what is needful for his own advantage, but he has no right to wrest it from his neighbour.”

1 (2) individual and general interests.

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load focus Introduction (Walter Miller, 1913)
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