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[61] Still more ingenious is the application of one thing to another on the ground of some resemblance, that is to say the adaptation to one thing of a circumstance which usually applies to something else, a type of jest which we may regard as being an ingenious form of fiction. For example, when ivory models of captured towns were carried in Caesar's triumphal procession, and a few days later wooden models of the same kind were carried at the triumph of Fabius Maximus,1 Chrysippus2 remarked that the latter were the cases for Caesar's ivory towns. And Pedo3 said of a heavy-armed gladiator who was pursuing another armed with a net and failed to strike him, “He wants to catch him alive.”

1 Legatus of Caesar in Spain. The wooden models were so worthless compared with those of ivory that Chrysippus said they must be no more than the boxes in which Caesar kept the latter.

2 Probably Chrysippus Vettins, a freedman and architeot. Presumably the poet Pedo Albinovanus.

3 Probably Chrysippus Vettins, a freedman and architeot. Presumably the poet Pedo Albinovanus.

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