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[78]

Thence like fierce wolves beneath the cloud of
night,

Aen. ii. 355.
precedes its subject. On the other hand, an example of the simile following its subject is to be found in the first Georgic, where, after the long lamentation over the wars civil and foreign that have afflicted Rome, there come the lines:

As when, their barriers down, the chariots speed
Lap after lap; in vain the charioteer
Tightens the curb: his steeds ungovernable
Sweep him away nor heeds the car the rein.

Georg. i. 512.
There is, however, no antapodosis in these similes.

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