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In the first place where she found seclusion, when she was quite by herself, they relate that she opened the chest and laid her face upon the face within and caressed it and wept. The child came quietly up behind her and saw what was there, and when the goddess became aware of his presence, she turned about and gave him one awful look of anger. The child could not endure the fright, and died. Others will not have it so, but assert that he fell overboard into the sea from the boat that was mentioned above.1 He also is the recipient of honours because of the goddess ; for they say that the Maneros of whom the Egyptians sing at their convivial gatherings is this very child.2 Some say, however, that his name was Palaestinus or Pelusius, and that the city founded by the goddess was named in his honour. They also recount that this Maneros who is the theme of their songs was the first to invent music. But some say that the word is not the name of any person, but an expression belonging to the vocabulary of drinking and feasting : ‘Good luck be ours in things like this!’, and that this is really the idea expressed [p. 45] by the exclamation ‘maneros’ whenever the Egyptians use it. In the same way we may be sure that the likeness of a corpse which, as it is exhibited to them, is carried around in a chest, is not a reminder of what happened to Osiris, as some assume ; but it is to urge them, as they contemplate it, to use and to enjoy the present, since all very soon must be what it is now and this is their purpose in introducing it into the midst of merry-making.3

1 At the end of the preceding chapter.

2 Cf. Herodotus, ii. 79; Pausanias, ix. 29. 3; Athenaeus, 620 a.

3 Cf. Moralia, 148 a; Herodotus, ii. 78; Lucian, De Luctu, 21.

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