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Chapter XXVIII.
FROM WHENCE IS IT THAT THE MOON RECEIVES HER LIGHT?

ANAXIMANDER thinks that she gives light to herself, but [p. 146] it is very slender and faint. Antiphon, that the moon shines by its own proper light; but when it absconds itself; the solar beams darting on it obscure it. Thus it naturally happens, that a more vehement light puts out a weaker; the same is seen in other stars. Thales and his followers, that the moon borrows all her light of the sun. Heraclitus, that the sun and moon are after the same manner affected; in their configurations both are shaped like boats, and are made conspicuous to us, receiving their light from moist exhalations. The sun appears to us more refulgent, by reason it is moved in a clearer and purer air; the moon appears more duskish, it being carried in an air more troubled and gross.

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