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Inscriptions


“When the physician Acron asked the council for a site for a monument to his father, who had reached the top of the same profession, Empedocles came forward and defeated the proposal by a speech in which he dilated upon equality, his chief argument being to ask ‘What inscription shall we put upon it? Shall it be this?

Acron son of Acros, Acragas the eminent physician, lies beneath the most eminent heidht of his most eminent birthplace.’1

CURFRAG.tlg-1342.1
Other writers give as the second line:

is laid in a tomb eminent upon an eminence.

CURFRAG.tlg-1342.2
Some authorities ascribe the couplet to Simonides.

Diogenes Laertius Lives of the Philosophers [Empedocles]

“Pausanias, according to Aristippus and Satyrus, was Empedocles' bosom-friend, and indeed it was he to whom he addressed his poem On Nature in the words: [fr. 1 Diels]. Moreover he wrote and epigram on him:

With good name was this Asclepiad physician Pausanias, son of Anchites, bred in his birthplace Gela; for many a wight that wasted in dire woes he turned back on his way to the chamber of Persephone.2

CURFRAG.tlg-1342.3
Diogenes Laertius Lives of the Philosophers [Empedocles]

1 every word of the Gk. contains kr or tr , and akr occurs in six words out of the eleven ( e.g. ‘Here is Dick Crick laid,| Son of Rick Crick of Cricklade, | A tip-top physician | In a tip-top position'); the father's real name was Xenon (Suid. Ἀ´κρων ): cf. Suid. Ἀ´κρων , Tz. Sch. in Hermog. Cram. A.O. 4. 119. 13, Hesych, Mil. 21, Rh. Gr. 3. 641 W, Eust. 1634. 12

2 Pausanias is here derived from παύω ‘to make to cease’ and ἀνία ‘pain’: cf. A.P. 7. 508 ( Σιμωνίδου

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