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Enter LYSIMACHUS, with PASICOMPSA, weeping.

LYSIMACHUS
to himself . I've lent my assistance to my friend in a friendly manner; this piece of goods, which my neighbour requested me, I've purchased. Turning to PASICOMPSA. You are my own; then follow me. Don't weep. You are acting very foolishly; spoiling such eyes. Why, really you have more reason to laugh than to be crying.

PASICOMPSA
In the name of heaven, prithee, my good old gentleman, do tell me----

LYSIMACHUS
Ask me what you please.

PASICOMPSA
Why have you bought me?

LYSIMACHUS
What, I, bought you? For you to do what you are bidden; in like manner what you bid me, I'll do.

PASICOMPSA
I am determined, to the best of my ability and skill, to do what I shall think you desire.

LYSIMACHUS
I shall bid you do nothing of laborious work.

PASICOMPSA
Why, really, for my part, my good old gentleman, I haven't learnt, i' faith, to carry burdens, or to feed cattle at the farm, or to nurse children.

LYSIMACHUS
If you choose to be a good girl, it shall be well for you.

PASICOMPSA
Then, i' faith, to my sorrow, I'm undone.

LYSIMACHUS
Why so?

PASICOMPSA
Because in the place from which I have been conveyed hither, it used to be well with the worthless1.

LYSIMACHUS
aside . By my troth, her talk alone is worth more than the sum that she was purchased at. To PASICOMPSA. As though you would say that no woman is good.

PASICOMPSA
Indeed I don't say so; nor is it my way, to say a thing which I believe all people are acquainted with.

LYSIMACHUS
I want to ask this one thing of you.

PASICOMPSA
I'll answer you when you ask.

LYSIMACHUS
What say you now? What am I to say your name is?

PASICOMPSA
Pasicompsa.

LYSIMACHUS
The name was given you from your good looks2. But what say you, Pasicompsa? Can you, if occasion should arise, spin a fine woof?

PASICOMPSA
I can.

LYSIMACHUS
If you know how to do a fine one, I'm sure you can spin a coarser one.

PASICOMPSA
For spinning, I fear no woman that's of the same age.

LYSIMACHUS
Upon my faith, I take it that you are good and industrious, since, young woman, now that you are grown up, you know how to do your duty.

PASICOMPSA
I' faith, I learned it from a skilful mistress. I won't let my work be called in question.

LYSIMACHUS
Well, thus the matter stands, i' faith. Look now, I'll give you a sheep for your own, one sixty years old.

PASICOMPSA
My good old gentleman, one so old as that?

LYSIMACHUS
It's of the Grecian breed. If you take care of it, it is a very good one; it is shorn very easily.

PASICOMPSA
For the sake of the compliment, whatever it is that shall be given me, I shall receive it with thanks.

LYSIMACHUS
Now, damsel, that you mayn't be mistaken, you are not mine; so don't think it.

PASICOMPSA
Prithee, tell me, then, whose I am?

LYSIMACHUS
You've been bought back for your own master. I've bought you back for him3; he requested me to do so.

PASICOMPSA
My spirits have returned, if good faith is kept with me.

LYSIMACHUS
Be of good courage; this person will give you your liberty. I' troth, he did so dote upon you this day as soon as ever he had seen you.

PASICOMPSA
I' faith, it's now two years since he commenced his connexion with me. Now, as I'm sure that you are a friend of his, I'll disclose it.

LYSIMACHUS
How say you? Is it now two years since he formed the connexion with you?

PASICOMPSA
Certainly, it is; and we agreed, on oath, between ourselves, I with him, and he with me, that I would never have intercourse with any man except himself, nor he with any woman except myself.

LYSIMACHUS
Immortal Gods! Isn't he even to sleep with his wife?

PASICOMPSA
Prithee, is he a married man? He neither is nor will he be.

LYSIMACHUS
Indeed, I wish he wasn't. I' faith, the fellow has been committing perjury.

PASICOMPSA
No young man do I more ardently love.

LYSIMACHUS
Why, really he's a child, you simpleton; for, in fact, it's not so very long a time since his teeth fell out.

PASICOMPSA
What? His teeth?

LYSIMACHUS
It's no matter? Follow me this way, please; he requested that I would find you room for one day in my house, since my wife is away in the country. He goes into his house, followed by PASICOMPSA.

1 Well with the worthless: She seems to mean that at Rhodes, where she has lately come from, women of light character are treated better than those who are virtuous.

2 From your good looks: Coming from two Greek words, signifying "all graces," or "attractions."

3 Back for him: She imagines all along that by the word "master" he means the young man Charinus; whereas Demipho is really intended.

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