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Enter THAIS.

THAIS
to herself. I really do believe that he'll be here presently, to force her away from me. Let him come; but if he touches her with a single finger, that instant his eyes shall be torn out. I can put up with his impertinences and his high-sounding words, as long as they remain words: but if they are turned into realities, he shall get a drubbing.

CHREMES
Thais, I've been here some time.

THAIS
O my dear Chremes, you are the very person I was wanting. Are you aware that this quarrel took place on your account, and that the whole of this affair, in fact, bore reference to yourself?

CHREMES
To me? How so, pray?

THAIS
Because, while I've been doing my best to recover and restore your sister to you, this and a great deal more like it I've had to put up with.

CHREMES
Where is she?

THAIS
At home, at my house.

CHREMES
starting. Hah!

THAIS
What's the matter? She has been brought up in a manner worthy of yourself and of her.

CHREMES
What is it you say?

THAIS
That which is the fact. Her I present to you, nor do I ask of you any return for her.

CHREMES
Thanks are both felt and shall be returned in such way, Thais, as you deserve.

THAIS
But still, take care, Chremes, that you don't lose her, before you receive her from me; for it is she, whom the Captain is now coming to take away from me by force. Do you go, Pythias, and bring out of the house the casket with the tokens.1

CHREMES
looking down the side Scene. Don't you see him, Thais?

PYTHIAS
to THAIS. Where is it put?

THAIS
In the clothes' chest. Tiresome creature, why do you delay? PYTHIAS goes into the house.

CHREMES
What a large body of troops the Captain is bringing with him against you. Bless me!

THAIS
Prithee, are you frightened, my dear sir?

CHREMES
Get out with you. What, I frightened? There's not a man alive less so.

THAIS
Then now is the time to prove it.

CHREMES
Why, I wonder what sort of a man you take me to be.

THAIS
Nay, and consider this too; the person that you have to deal with is a foreigner;2 of less influence than you, less known, and one that has fewer friends here.

CHREMES
I'm aware of that; but it's foolish to run the risk of what you are able to avoid. I had rather we should prevent it, than, having received an injury, avenge ourselves upon him. Do you go in and fasten the door, while I run across hence to the Forum; I should like us to have the aid of some legal adviser in this disturbance. Moves, as if going.

THAIS
holding him. Stay.

CHREMES
Let me go, I'll be here presently.

THAIS
There's no occasion, Chremes. Only say that she is your sister, and that you lost her when a little girl, and have now recognized her; then show the tokens. Re-enter PYTHIAS from the house, with the trinkets.

PYTHIAS
giving them to THAIS. Here they are.

THAIS
giving them to CHREMES. Take them. If he offers any violence, summon the fellow to justice; do you understand me?

CHREMES
Perfectly.

THAIS
Take care and say this with presence of mind.

CHREMES
I'll take care.

THAIS
Gather up your cloak. Aside. Undone! the very person whom I've provided as a champion, wants one himself. They all go into the house.

1 Casket with the tokens: It was the custom with the ancients when they exposed their children, to leave with them some pledge or token of value, that they might afterward be recognized by means of them. The catastrophes of the Curculio, the Rudens, and other Plays of Plautus, are brought about by taking advantage of this circumstance. The reasons for using these tokens will be stated in a future Note.

2 Is a foreigner: And therefore the more unlikely to obtain redress from an Athenian tribunal. See the Andria, l. 811, and the Note to the passage.

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