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Against these preparations, Pompey made use of several large ships which he found in the port of Brundusium: and having fi ted them with towers of three stories, which he filled with a great number of engines and darts, let them loose upon Caesar's floats, to break through the staccado, and interrupt the works. Thus daily skirmishes happened with darts, arrows, and slings, at a distance. Amidst these hostilities, Caesar's thoughts were still bent upon peace; and though he could not but wonder that Magius, whom he had sent with proposals to Pompey, was not yet returned with an answer; and even saw his designs and undertakings retarded by his frequent offers of this kind, he nevertheless still persevered in these peaceable resolutions. Accordingly, he despatched Caninius Rebilus, one of his lieutenants, a relation and intimate friend of Scribonius Libo, to confer with him on this subject. He charged him to exhort that nobleman to think seriously of peace, and, if possible, procure an interview between him and Pompey. Could this be effected, he showed there was the greatest ground to believe that peace would soon be concluded on reasonable terms; the honour and reputation of which would in a manner wholly redound to Libo, if, by his mediation, both parties slould be prevailed with to lay down their arms. Libo, after conferring with Caninius, waited on Pompey: soon after he returned with this answer; that the consuls were absent, without whom Pompey had no power to treat of an accommodation. Thus Caesar having often tried in vain to bring about a peace, thought it now time to drop that design, and bend all his thoughts to war.

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