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[87] A proof of the swiftness and of the rivalry of both is that, according to the account, our ancestors on one and the same day1 learned of the landing of the barbarians, rushed to the defense of the borders of their land, won the battle, and set up a trophy of victory over the enemy; while the Lacedaemonians in three days and as many nights2 covered twelve hundred stadia in marching order: so strenuously did they both hasten, the Lacedaemonians to share in the dangers, the Athenians to engage the enemy before their helpers should arrive.

1 Isocrates makes greater “haste” than Hdt. 6.110.

2 This agrees with Hdt. 6.120.

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hide References (7 total)
  • Cross-references to this page (3):
    • Raphael Kühner, Bernhard Gerth, Ausführliche Grammatik der griechischen Sprache, KG 1.3.1
    • Raphael Kühner, Bernhard Gerth, Ausführliche Grammatik der griechischen Sprache, KG 3.5.2
    • William Watson Goodwin, Syntax of the Moods and Tenses of the Greek Verb, Chapter IV
  • Cross-references in notes from this page (2):
    • Herodotus, Histories, 6.110
    • Herodotus, Histories, 6.120
  • Cross-references in general dictionaries to this page (2):
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