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We ought, therefore, to think of the art of discourse just as we think of the other arts, and not to form opposite judgements about similar things, nor show ourselves intolerant toward that power which, of all the faculties which belong to the nature of man, is the source of most of our blessings. For in the other powers which we possess, as I have already said on a former occasion,1 we are in no respect superior to other living creatures; nay, we are inferior to many in swiftness and in strength and in other resources;

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    • Isocrates, Panegyricus, 48
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