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[315] Will you allow me to speak? Or shall I just turn and go?

Do you not know even now how much your voice sickens me?

Is the pain in your ears, or in your soul?

And why would you define the seat of my pain?

He who did it hurts your heart, but I, your ears.

[320] God! How plain it is that you are a born babbler.

Perhaps, but never the author of this action.

Yes, and what is more, you sold your life for silver.

Ah! It is truly sad when the judge judges wrong .

Expound on “judgment” as you will. But, if you fail to [325] show me the perpetrators of these crimes, you will avow that money basely earned wreaks sorrows.Exit Creon.

Well, may the man be found! That would be best. But, whether he be caught or not—for fortune must decide that—I assure you that you will not see me come here again. [330] Saved just now beyond hope and belief, I owe the gods great thanks.Exit the Guard.

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  • Commentary references to this page (2):
    • Sir Richard C. Jebb, Commentary on Sophocles: Antigone, 993
    • Sir Richard C. Jebb, Commentary on Sophocles: Philoctetes, 872
  • Cross-references to this page (1):
    • Raphael Kühner, Bernhard Gerth, Ausführliche Grammatik der griechischen Sprache, KG 3.6.1
  • Cross-references in general dictionaries to this page (1):
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