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Chorus
Tecmessa, daughter of Teleutas, terrible is your news that our lord has been possessed by his sorrows.

Within.

Ajax
wailing.
Oh! Ah, me! Ah, me!

Tecmessa
Soon there will be more sorrow, it seems. Did you not hear [335] Ajax, did you not hear his resounding howl?

Ajax
wailing.
O! Ah, me! Ah, me!

Chorus
The man seems to be sick, or else to be still pained by the disease which was recently with him, since he sees its traces.

Ajax
wailing.
O my son, my son!

Tecmessa
[340] Ah, miserable me! Eurysaces, it is for you he calls! What can his purpose be? Where are you? I am miserable!

Ajax
Teucer! Where is Teucer? Will his raid last for ever? While I perish?

Chorus
He seems to be sane—open the door! [345] Perhaps merely at the sight of me he will come to a more respectable mood.

Tecmessa
There, it is open. Now you can look on this man's deeds, and his true condition.

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hide References (3 total)
  • Commentary references to this page (1):
    • Sir Richard C. Jebb, Commentary on Sophocles: Ajax, 847
  • Cross-references in general dictionaries to this page (2):
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