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Messenger
I found you in Cithaeron's winding glens.

Oedipus
And why were you roaming those regions?

Messenger
I was in charge of mountain flocks.

Oedipus
What, you were a shepherd—a vagrant hireling?

Messenger
[1030] But your savior, my son, in that hour.

Oedipus
And what was my pain when you took me in your arms?

Messenger
The ankles of your feet might bear witness.

Oedipus
Ah me, why do you speak of that old trouble?

Messenger
I freed you when you had your ankles pinned together.

Oedipus
[1035] It was a dread brand of shame that I took from my cradle.

Messenger
So much so that from that fortune you were called by that name which you still bear.

Oedipus
Oh, in the name of the gods, was the deed my mother's or father's? Speak!

Messenger
I know not. He who gave you to me knows better of that than I.

Oedipus
What, you got me from another? You did not find me yourself?

Messenger
[1040] No. Another shepherd gave you to me.

Oedipus
Who was he? Can you tell clearly?

Messenger
I think he was said to be one of the household of Laius.

Oedipus
The king who ruled this country long ago?

Messenger
The same. The man was a herdsman in his service.

Oedipus
[1045] Is he still alive, that I might see him?

Messenger
You natives of this country should know best.

Oedipus
Is there any of you here present that knows the herdsman of whom he speaks, having seen him either in the pastures or here in town? Answer! [1050] The hour has come for these things to be revealed finally.

Chorus
I think he speaks of no other than the peasant you already wanted to see. But our lady Iocasta might best tell you that.

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hide References (5 total)
  • Commentary references to this page (2):
    • Sir Richard C. Jebb, Commentary on Sophocles: Ajax, 34
    • Sir Richard C. Jebb, Commentary on Sophocles: Trachiniae, 236
  • Cross-references to this page (1):
    • Raphael Kühner, Bernhard Gerth, Ausführliche Grammatik der griechischen Sprache, KG 3.6.1
  • Cross-references in general dictionaries to this page (2):
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