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[49] But you are so far from deserving pity, that more than any man in the world you should rightly be detested for the deeds you have wrought—you who, owing one hundred and five minae and not being able to satisfy your creditors, and then finding men who helped you to raise the money and enabled you to do what was right by those who originally made the loan, are seeking, quite apart from the wrongs you committed against them in regard to the loan itself, also to deprive them of their civic rights. In the case of other men one may see borrowers having to give up their property, but in your case it is the lender who has come to this plight, and, having lent a talent, has been forced to pay two talents as the victim of a baseless charge;

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hide References (8 total)
  • Commentary references to this page (6):
    • F. A. Paley, Select Private Orations of Demosthenes, 1
    • F. A. Paley, Select Private Orations of Demosthenes, 51
    • F. A. Paley, Select Private Orations of Demosthenes, 23
    • F. A. Paley, Select Private Orations of Demosthenes, 22
    • F. A. Paley, Select Private Orations of Demosthenes, 6
    • J. E. Sandys, Select Private Orations of Demosthenes, 29
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