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DICAEOPOLIS
Oh, Phales,1 companion of the orgies of Bacchus, night reveller, god of adultery, friend of young men, these past six2 years I have not been able to invoke thee. With what joy I return to my farmstead, thanks to the truce I have concluded, freed from cares, from fighting and from Lamachuses!3 How much sweeter, oh Phales, oh, Phales, is it to surprise Thratta, the pretty woodmaid, Strymodorus' slave, stealing wood from Mount Phelleus, to catch her under the arms, to throw her on the ground and possess her, Oh, Phales, Phales! If thou wilt drink and bemuse thyself with me, we shall to-morrow consume some good dish in honour of the peace, and I will hang up my buckler over the smoking hearth.

1 The god of generation, worshipped in the form of a phallus.

2 A remark which fixes the date of the production of The Acharnians, viz. the sixth year of the Peloponnesian War, 426 B.C.

3 Lamachus was an Athenian general, who figures later in this comedy.

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426 BC (1)
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  • Commentary references to this page (1):
    • Sir Richard C. Jebb, Commentary on Sophocles: Trachiniae, 1055
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