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Exeunt Strepsiades and Phidippides.

Pasias
(entering with his summons-witness) Then, ought a man to throw away any part of his own property? Never! But it were better then at once to put away blushes, rather than now to have trouble; since I am now dragging you to be a witness, for the sake of my own money; and further, in addition to this, I shall become an enemy to my fellow-tribesman. But never, while I live, will I disgrace my country, but will summon Strepsiades.

Strep.
(from within)
Who's there?

Pas.
For the Old and New.

Strep.
I call you to witness, that he has named it for two days. For what matter do you summon me?

Pas.
For the twelve minae, which you received when you were buying the dapple-gray horse.

Strep.
A horse? Do you not hear? I, whom you all know to hate horsemanship!

Pas.
And, by Jupiter! You swore by the gods too, that you would repay it.

Strep.
Ay, by Jove! For then my Phidippides did not yet know the irrefragable argument.

Pas.
And do you now intend, on this account, to deny the debt?

Strep.
Why, what good should I get else from his instruction?

Pas.
And will you be willing to deny these upon oath of the gods?

Strep.
What gods?

Pas.
Jupiter, Mercury, and Neptune.

Strep.
Yes, by Jupiter! And would pay down, too, a three-obol piece besides to swear.

Pas.
Then may you perish some day for your impudence!

Strep.
This man would be the better for it if he were cleansed by rubbing with salt.

Pas.
Ah me, how you deride me!

Strep.
He will contain six choae.

Pas.
By great Jupiter and the gods, you certainly shall not do this to me with impunity!

Strep.
I like your gods amazingly; and Jupiter, sworn by, is ridiculous to the knowing ones.

Pas.
You will assuredly suffer punishment, some time or other, for this. But answer and dismiss me, whether you are going to repay me my money or not.

Strep.
Keep quiet now, for I will presently answer you distinctly.

Runs into the house.

Pas.
(to his summons-witness). What do you think he will do?

Witness.
I think he will pay you.

Re-enter Strepsiades with a kneading-trough

Strep.
Where is this man who asks me for his money? Tell me what is this?

Pas.
What is this? A kardopos.

Strep.
And do you then ask me for your money, being such an ignorant person? I would not pay, not even an obolus, to any one who called the kardope kardopos.

Pas.
Then won't you pay me?

Strep.
Not, as far as I know. Will you not then pack off as fast as possible from my door?

Pas.
I will depart; and be assured of this, that I will make deposit against you, or may I live no longer!

Strep.
Then you will lose it besides, in addition to your twelve minae. And yet I do not wish you to suffer this, because you named the kardopos floolishly.

Exeunt Pasias and Witness, and enter Amynias

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hide References (5 total)
  • Cross-references to this page (2):
    • Herbert Weir Smyth, A Greek Grammar for Colleges, THE PARTICIPLE
    • Raphael Kühner, Bernhard Gerth, Ausführliche Grammatik der griechischen Sprache, KG 1.3.1
  • Cross-references in notes to this page (1):
    • Raphael Kühner, Bernhard Gerth, Ausführliche Grammatik der griechischen Sprache, KG 3.5.3
  • Cross-references in general dictionaries to this page (2):
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